Past Articles

New Findings on Acetaminophen and Pregnancy

During pregnancy, it's all about the healthy development of the mother and child. There is a host of medical providers and practitioners who focus on prenatal care through vitamins, check-ups, and health tips – including what to avoid.  It's no longer news that alcohol and tobacco are among the substances to avoid during pregnancy, but a new study suggests that acetaminophen, the active ingredient in certain painkillers, may be added to that list.  Last month, a new study was published in JAMA Pediatrics that explored the relationship between acetaminophen use during pregnancy and childhood behavioral problems. These findings concluded that while further investigations are needed to clarify the relationship between the pain medication and abnormal fetal neurodevelopment, children appear to be more at-risk of developing behavioral problems if the mother took acetaminophen while pregnant.  No matter the drug, healthcare providers suggest using the lowest effective dose or avoiding pain medications whenever possible during pregnancy.  It is very common for women to experience pains during pregnancy. In fact, 50 percent or more of women experience back pain while pregnant. Physical and hormonal changes can cause pain leading to stress and anxiety – both of which can negatively impact both the mother and the baby.  But with new research suggesting that pain medications may lead to potentially serious side effects for fetal neurodevelopment, mothers may wonder what to do about their pain. Fortunately, doctors of chiropractic have a solution.  Chiropractic care is a safe, gentle, and effective method of treating soft tissue and joint pains that arise during pregnancy. And as chiropractic treatment focuses on the source of pain rather than masking symptoms, doctors of chiropractic are important members of a pregnant mother's healthcare team to support her overall well-being both before and after childbirth.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: JAMA Pediatr. 2016;170(10):964-970. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.1775