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For Better Lipid Levels, Encourage Kids and Adults to Consume Fewer Sugary Drink

Children may not know the difference between "good" and "bad" cholesterol, but both parents and children should understand that habits formed in childhood could have lasting effects on their health. A recent study found that children who lowered their intake of sugary drinks by at least one serving per week over a 12-month period increased high-density lipoprotein (HDL), known as the good cholesterol that supports heart health. The yearlong study, performed by researchers at Tufts University in Boston, gathered results from 690 children in the area, with 380 completed questionnaire responses by the twelfth month. The 690 preliminary questionnaires were given to children between ages 8 and 15, 85% of who stated they had consumed sugary beverages such as sodas, fruit juices and sweet tea over the past week. Nearly 20% reported consuming at least one sugary beverage each day. The study found that older children and those with a lower socioeconomic background tended to consume more sugary beverages. The children who drank sweetened beverages tended to consume more total calories, but fewer fruits and vegetables, and be more sedentary. Other studies have suggested that decreasing sugar intake in adults can also lower triglyceride levels, which is a contributing cause of heart disease.


Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: The Journal of Nutrition, online September 2, 2015.